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Society of Dew and Light studied Indian Magic, nature rites and many other mystical things. Members called themselves The Ros.Crux Fraters (probably meaning ‘The Rose Cross Fathers’). David Lund a mechanic who was partner with his brother Thomas of a  small engineering business at Albert Foundry acted as secretary. Lund lived at first 190 Spring Gardens Lane, then Fern Cottage. They produced Lamp of Thoth  the name of a magazine they published around 1888 being the same year The Golden Dawn set up their Horus temple in nearby Bradford. 
Only two issues of this magazine were originally published. Members were made up of some very influential people from in and around the  area. Marie Campbell, suggests that the group may also have had what might now be described as a psycho geographical bent. She suggests that Daniel Murgatroyd,  of the local landowning family who built East Riddlesden Hall, was once a member of the Organisation. He was known to possess a “spell book” attributed to Sir Henry Clifford, the Second Earl of Cumberland, who occupied Skipton Castle and Barden Tower in the 16th Century and is remembered for practicing alchemy with the assistance of the monks at nearby Bolton Abbey.
They used to hold their meetings in a house on Parkwood Street, number 14, where the single story garage now stands between the houses and the stone workshop. Because of the mysterious goings on after, possible haunting's, the house was pulled down. A family that lived there who's children could not sleep because of a scratching noise which made them too afraid to sleep took to sleeping altogether down stairs. After when a partition in the room was removed they found a door covered with what looked like scratches.

Rev. T. Dury - A kind man
The history and conversion of Samuel Harris
With the assistance of my leader, Mr. Hughes, I was afterwards bound an apprentice to a hair-dresser, who was a member of the Methodist society. In this place, I was very comfortable; and, with a degree of pleasure, I used to reflect on the innocence of my employment, thinking if ever I should be able to maintain myself by this business, it would be getting a living honestly in the sight of men. I lived in this place about ten months, when my master gave up the business, began the cotton trade, and left the town. Thus I was again left to shift for myself. There were only two others of the business who kept the Sabbath day holy, and they either would not, or could not take me. As I would not bind myself to Sabbath-breakers, I was obliged to think of some other business. 
About this time, Mr. Butterfield, a young gentleman from Keighley, was on a visit at Mr. Clegg's, who wanted a footman. Mr. C. recommended me to him, and he agreed to take me. He immediately called in a tailor, procured for me a suit of clothes, and was the first who offered me wages. He took me with him to Manchester during the Conference, and having stopped a month there, he took me to my new home at Keighley. I lived with him a year, during which time, except a few trials I met with from persons who took pleasure in reproaching me for being a descendant of Jews, I was very comfortable; but my master determining not to keep a footman any longer, I was dismissed. I was mortified at being so unfortunate, but I hoped that the God of the fatherless would not suffer me to be tried more than I was able to bear, but would make a way for my escape. 
A fellow, servant advised me to make my circumstances known to the Rev. T. Dury, Rector of Keighley, as he was a very humane man. I took her advice, and told Mr. D. that my master was going to travel without a footman, and that I should be left without a situation. He said he would call on my master to ascertain my character, and then he would do for me what he could. When I called on him again, he told me he would write to some of his friends on my behalf, and if I did not meet with a situation by the time I should leave Mr. B., I might come to his house until I met with one. I was truly thankful to God, that he had disposed tho heart of a stranger to be my friend, for I had very little knowledge of Mr. Dury before. It is a true saying, that "a friend in need is a friend indeed." When my time was up with Mr. B., Mr. Dury welcomed me to his house, and when I had lived with him a month, he procured for me a situation as footman with F. J. Lace.

Organ Builders

John William Lupton - Organ Builder: Partner  in the company Driver and Lupton Organ Builders, Russell Works, Russell Street. (est. 1877) He made the organ at St. Paul’s Church, Keighley, other organs built by him being those at Slack Lane Baptist Church, near Keighley (a large 3- manual instrument with 36 stops); West Lane Primitive Methodist Chapel, Keighley ( 2-manual, 20 Stops); Hermit Hole Wesleyan Chapel, Keighley (2-manual , 18 stops) 

Harrison & Harrison made many of the organs for the churches in Keighley

Laycock and Bannister of Crosshills


War Memorials

War Memorial Windows from Temple Street Methodist Chapel keighleysharedchurch.org.uk
Men of Worth web site commemorates the men and women of Keighley and the Worth Valley who served our country in times of war. Also contains War Memorials from Keighley and the surrounding area.

Brief history of the Baptist Church in Keighley Click here with some information on the Town family. 
Christadelphians:
Campbell Street

Latter Day Saints
, Mormon sect. Assembly Rooms, Grange Street, Lawkholme Lane. See entry for Catholic Apostolic Church.
Spiritualism.—On Whit Sunday, a camp meeting was held on Haworth Moor, by the Christian Spiritualists of Haworth, Keighley, and the surrounding district. The day being fine, a large number of persons assembled to hear the principles of spiritualism ably expounded by Mr. B. Morrell, of Keighley; Mr. A. Shackleton, of Haworth; and Mr. Naylor, of Keighley. A select party of musicians and singers added interest to the proceedings on the occasion." —Keighley and Skipton Mercury.

Vicars and Priests 1921 Abode
Rev. Richard Bolton Primitive Methodist 91 Devonshire Street
Rev. William J Baker Wesleyan Devonshire Park Manse
Rev. John Haigh Congregational  109 North Street
Rev. John Richard Hargreaves Wesleyan Devonshire Park Manse
Rev. William George Heritage 25 Holker Street
Rev. Geo. C Mayes 38 Chapel Lane
Rev. John Francis Phillips Curate of Parish Church Highfield Lane
Rev. Jacob Prince  Curate St Mary's Church Sandywood Cottage, North Street
Rev. Edward Pringle Congregational High Spring Gardens

1852 Sunday School treat
 
(Exact location to find)


1863 The foundation-stone of a Baptist chapel, to be erected near to Skipton Road, Keighley, has been laid. Messrs. Paul & Ayliffe, of Manchester, are the architects. The style is Byzantine, freely treated. Accommodation will be provided for 800. There will be side and end galleries, and behind the pulpit a recess for organ and choir. Beneath the organ floor two vestries will be placed. The basement floor will be I1 feet high, and will contain a school-room, a lecture room capable of holding 150 persons, a vestry for the minister, a tea-room, and four class-rooms. The contract for the whole of the building has been taken by Messrs. Gibson & Maude, of Keighley, for 2,5792. 4s., exclusive of the ironwork, which will be supplied by Messrs. Clapham.

Albert Street Baptist Church
 

The photograph on top right shows the new Sunday School which opened 1914 which contained a central hall, a primary department, 14 classrooms and accommodation for 500 scholars, a kitchen, lavatories and a Christian Endeavour room. February 14, 1914, Mr. T H Haggas laid a memorial stone for the new Albert Street Baptist Sunday School. He was the great-grandson of John Town, founder of Keighley's original Baptist chapel.
The first Albert Street Baptist church was built about 1865. The first Baptist place of worship was in Baptist Square in 1810 till 1815 when a chapel was built in Turkey Street and used until 1865.

NOTICE is hereby given, that a separate building, named the Baptist Chapel, situate in Albert-street, Keighley, in the parish of Keighley, in the county of York, in the district of Keighley, being a building certified according to law as a place of litigious worship, was, on the 7th day of October, 1865, duly registered for solemnizing marriages therein, pursuant to the Act of 6th and 7th Wm. IV., cap. 85, being substituted for the building known as Bethel Baptist Chapel, situate at Baptist-square, Keighley, in the parish of Keighley, in the county of York aforesaid, cancelled. Witness my hand this 21st day of October, 1865 'Geo. Spencer, Superintendent Registrar.
1889 A presentation of a marble clock to M.J.Wood at Albert Street Sunday School

 

Alice Street Primitive Methodist Church Central Hall


NOTICE is hereby given, that a separate building, named Primitive Methodist Chapel, situate at Alice Street, Keighley, in the parish of Keighley, in the county of York, in the district of Keighley, being a building certified  according to law as a place of religious worship, was, on the 4th day of November, 1893, duly registered for solemnizing marriages therein, pursuant to the Act of 6th and 7th Wm. 4, cap. 85; being substituted for the Primitive Methodist Chapel, Queen Street, Keighley, now disused;— Witness my hand this 6th day of November, 1893. GEORGE E. SPENCER, Superintendent Registrar.


All Saints Church Highfield
The school church of All saints was erected in 1878—9, in Highfield lane, and is built of stone in the Geometric style, at a cost of £2,162, inclusive of the value of the site which with £200 was given by the Duke of Devonshire; the building was opened on July 25th. 1879, by the Bishop of Hereford, and has 300 sittings.. In 1917 the Bible class donated a stained glass window, a painting by James Clark turned into stained glass as a war memorial, unusual in that is was presented before the end of conflict. There is the same scene at  St Margaret, Mountain Ash, Rhondda Cynon Taff stainedglass.llgc.org.uk
In 1888 an organ was commissioned from Harrison and Harrison organ builders. Architects was Bailey and Son, 3 Scott Street. 

Apostolic Church Apsley Street

 

Assemblies of God Pentecostal Church, Kensington Street

London Gazette 8 November 2001 Marriage Acts
The Registrar General being satisfied that the following Buildings are no longer used by the congregations on whose behalf they were registered for marriages in accordance with the Marriage Act 1949 (as amended) has cancelled their registrations: Assemblies of God Pentecostal Church, Kensington Street, Keighley

 

Beechcliffe (Wesleyan) Church
Used to stand where 1-2 Badgers Drift is now.  Formerly the site of Beechcliffe Methodist Church from c.1890 until approximately 1995 when the property was demolished due to its destruction from arson attack. The last service at Beechcliffe Methodist Chapel was on 29th Aug 1993.

 

Bethel Baptist Chapel, (West Turkey Street/Burlington Street) Baptist Square. Chapel, school House and grave yard. Located around the area where there is now a yard, next door to the Post Office sorting office and a little way from the Brown Cow.
There was a burial ground attached, the remains being removed to Utley. 
The Baptists were first introduced into Keighley by a Mr. John Town, who was a member of the Baptist church at Haworth. Around 1810 John opened up one of his rooms at home for worship. On Easter Monday, 1813 the first stone was laid for a chapel on land provided by Town. The chapel did not opened until the 29th of March, 1815; when Mr. Lister, of Liverpool, Mr. Stephens, of Rochdale, and the venerable Dr. Steadman, of Bradford, were engaged. 
At this period the church consisted of eighteen members. The chapel cost around than £990; and  seat about 615 persons. The first pastor  was Mr. Joseph Shaw, who arrived in 1814. During the years 1816 until 1819 the members amounted to 33; and there appears to have been some uneasiness originating with a part of the church and the minister, so a separation took place, and a new chapel was erected by the party attached to Mr. Shaw, at Slacklane, some two to three miles from Keighley. This  left the church at Keighley very small, and greatly diminished the congregation. Mr. Town and his wife, who died within ten days of each other; and whose remains were deposited in the burial-ground adjoining the chapel; and to whose memory a handsome tombstone was been erected by the family.
Bethel Baptist Chapel was used until around 1865 when it was replaced by Albert Street Baptist Church
Marriage On Tuesday, Dec. 24th, 1844, Mr. John Rhodes and Miss Emma Rushworth were married at the Baptist Chapel, Keighley, by Mr. W. J. Stuart, minister. This being the first marriage here, the bridal pair were presented with a handsome Bible, and a copy of Watts and the New Selection bound together. Printed & Published by J. Heaton.
1861 the census tells us that William Murgatroyd a native of Keighley was the Minister. 
Closed and become a lodging house. 

Bocking Wesleyan Chapel
1896-1967.

Bogthorn Primitive Methodist Chapel used to stand here. Hebden Wright willed £1000

 

Bogthorn  Wesleyan Methodist Church

Bracken Bank Baptist Church
Opened 1957 closed before 1971
The Registrar General, being satisfied that Bracken Bank Baptist Church, Keighley in the registration district of Worth Valley in the county of York West Riding, is no longer used as a place of worship by the congregation on whose behalf it was on 27th February 1959 registered for marriages in accordance with the Marriage Acts, 1949 to 1959 has cancelled the registration.—Dated 12th November 1970.  J Raby, Superintendent Registrar.

     
Braithwaite School Church
. Foundation stone laid on Shrove Tuesday 1858 by the
Rev. William BUSFEILD M.A. Rector of Keighley. Opened 1859. Cost £950. New organ by Murgatroyd, Driver & Lupton of Keighley. Inaugurated 24Feb1879. Cost about £150.

 

Catholic Apostolic Church, Grange Street, Lawkholme
Was nothing to do with the Apostolic church at Queens Road.
From information on archiveshub.ac.uk "The Registers for the Keighley congregation date from 1883, and members of the congregation celebrated the opening of a new church in Grange Street, Lawkholme in 1897. The members were transferred to Bradford c. 1925." Not a true Catholic church despite its name. It was the place of worship of a tiny sect who also had a church in Bradford amongst others. 
It grew out of a faction of the Scottish Presbyterian church & surprisingly developed a long & complex liturgy & style of worship close to both the Russian & Greek Orthodox with a bit of Catholic thrown into the mix. By 1925 the Keighley congregation were transferred to Bradford, if not earlier. The Mormons were meeting in Grange Street by 1910 possibly in the same building

Cavendish Street Wesleyan Methodist Sunday School 

Cavendish Street United Methodist Free Church  "Cock Chapel"



A building of stone with square tower surmounted by an octagonal spire; it was built at a cost of £8,500, including purchase of site, opened in October, 1868, and will seat 1,000.  Nicknamed the "Cock Chapel" in honour of its weathercock, 125ft up  the highest spire in Keighley. Could seat 1,000 worshippers.
During Second World War it had been the well-known headquarters of the Keighley Squadron of the Air Training Corps.
a building of stone with square tower surmounted by an octagonal spire; it was built at a cost of £8,500, including purchase of site, opened in October, 1868 demolished 1952. Its final services were held in 1937.

Extended in 1874

THE LONDON GAZETTE, FEBRUARY 12, 1869. 
NOTICE is hereby given, that a separate building, named the United Methodist Free Church, situate at Cavendish Street, in Keighley, in the parish of Keighley, in the county of York, in the district of Keighley, being a building certified according to law as a place of religious worship, was, on the 17th day of November, 1868, duly registered for solemnizing marriages therein, pursuant to the Act of 6th and 7th  Wm. IV., cap. 85, being substituted for the building known as the United Methodist Free Church Chapel, at Sun-street, Keighley aforesaid, now, disused. Witness my hand this 8th of February, 1869. Geo. Spencer, Superintendent Registrar.
The photo's below provided by Allan Smith.


 


Church of the Nazarene, Oakworth
Rd, see Oakworth Road Primitive Methodist Chapel


Cross Roads Primitive Methodist Chapel
Sited just a few yards further up the Keighley Road form the Bocking Wesleyan Chapel.

Democratic Sunday School, Working Men's Hall, Sun StreetAlso known as The Working Men's Hall Sunday School.


Established before 1839. Denomination None. Also known as The Working Men's Hall Sunday School. This newspaper clipping from 1841 refers to Thwaites Democratic Sunday School. Benjamin Morrell, was Secretary

 


Devonshire Park Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Vernon St off Spring Gardens Lane built 1877.  chapel  including Sunday school premises, at a cost of £7,000, Closed 1957

 


Devonshire Street Congregational Church demolished 1964. 
New Devonshire House now stands here.
built at a cost of £4,000, opened in June, 1856, and has 1,000 sittings; connected with this chapel are various societies, a library of over 1,500 volumes and a Sunday school erected in spencer street, at a cost of £4,000 The foundation stone was laid in 1855 by Mr. Brigg. 
Sir Swire Smith died of congestion of the lungs on 16 March 1918 in a London nursing home after a minor operation on his prostate gland, at the age of 76.  
His funeral took place at Devonshire Street Congregational Church in Keighley four days later. 
Some of the mill owning
families that attended the church were, Claphams, Cravens and most notably the Briggs, John Brigg would serve as senior deacon. A building that was expected to last was by 1955 starting to lean at the front. An examining architect at the time suggested that modern traffic had contributed to the problem.

Devonshire Street New Church
The society's first place of worship in a house in Beckside which was then situated in green fields. The most well known minister of Keighley New Church was the Rev. Joseph Wright who was ordained as the third minister of the New Church in 1790 - the other two being Hindmarsh and Samuel Smith who had also served in the Great Haworth. Round. The New Church opened its first Sunday school in 1791. 
In 1805 the society built its first chapel in King Street, on the 1852 map we see it with a grave yard and titled "The Lords Church".  The premises in Devonshire Street were opened in 1891. It later became an independent Catholic church, and at the moment is a mosque. 


Eastwood Chapel
: Dalton Lane. Methodist Church and School.



Started out being called Eastwood Chapel having been built in 1866, the foundation stone was laid in 1865 by Sir Isaac Holden. Built at a cost of £900 and will hold 600.
Relocated in 1891 and then called Eastwood New Chapel and around 1899 changed it's name to Victoria Park Methodist. (See lower down) The old building in Dalton Lane was taken over by the spiritualists around 1892. Located at the left and top of old Dalton lane, The Queens Hotel being on the right side of the old road, and between old and new Dalton Lane. 

Much later it would become a club, selling alcohol! 
Eddie Kelly has provided us with some additional information:
The Eastwood club was very well known right through to the 1980's The Waverley pub didn't succeed for long. The premises reverted back to a club. It was used as the Keighley Trades Union club or some such name & also as an Irish club. But like the pub before them & the Conservative club failed because they were the wrong side of Station Bridge & couldn't attract custom

When the foundation stone was laid they buried a time capsule under the stone, this was discovered by the workmen when the building was demolished to make way for the new collage, we saw the items up for sale on ebay in early 2012, the items were a glass plate describing the event and naming the people who were present, the glass now sadly broken, also included were some newspapers from that date.


Ebenezer Primitive Methodist Chapel, Crossroads
geograph.org.uk photo Built in 1884. 

 

Exley Head Wesleyan Methodist Church.  

Photo's by Allan Smith

Opened 1857. Accommodates 250 worshipers. Cost £375.


Fell Lane Wesleyan
Methodist Chapel
From 'Keighley Past & Present' by William KEIGHLEY. Plans drawn by a Mr. James RUSHWORTH. Foundation stone laid 01 Sep 1877 by Miss Kate PICKLES & Mr. A. ALMOND. Opened 09 Apr 1878 by the Rev. Robert MORTON of Leeds. Cost £850 including furniture. To accommodate 250, closed 1990. Now a dwelling.

Friends Meeting House. See Quaker Meeting House

Greengate Sunday School.

The 1894 map shows a Sunday School at the South Street end of Greengate on the right of the elbow just after Sunderland Street. In the photo we can just see it in the middle distance.
We are not sure what the event is, but we think it may be a Whit Walk, we feel sure that the event was connected to the Sunday School.
We believe that it might  well have been a Primitive Methodist Sunday School for we have read that Marriner of Greengate helped support such a Sunday School that was not far from his works. 
It would seem that the life of this school was short and that the building was taken into use by Greengate Mill, now demolished. 

 

Hainworth Wesleyan Methodist Chapel 
First built in 1847 to seat 150, rebuilt 1884 to accommodate 200.
Taken from Minutes of the Committee of Council on Education: Volume 2: This is at the little hamlet of Hainworth, two miles up a packhorse route, along the moors from Keighley towards Halifax, and is in circumstances somewhat similar to the preceding, being used only for a chapel and Sunday-school. 
It is conveyed to trustees expressly for chapel purposes, with a proviso that it may also be used for a day-school, under the direction of the trustees and the superintendent preacher, unless they should think well to remove the school to some other place. It has never, however, from the first been opened for the purposes of a day-school; and other day-schools having arisen in neighbouring localities, it is not now contemplated to open it for them. The last service at Hainworth Chapel was on 10th April 1977.


Heber Street Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
It was built to be used as a school but was re commissioned to be  used as a church. Most definitely in existence between 1867 and 1895 as minutes exist for the time between these dates. In 1895 taken into use by the
Spiritualists.

Heber Street Spiritualists Society
1853 David Richmond (1816 – 1891) became a Spiritualist whilst living in America and upon his return to his native town of Darlington, England in 1853, tried unsuccessfully to open a Spiritualist church. He moved to Keighley and there established the first Spiritualist church in England. They took over Heber Street Wesleyan School in 1895 which had been built in 1872 and cost £1,000, and will seat 300.. Previous to moving into Heber Street they had held their meetings in Schools, working men's halls and the Lyceum Buildings, East Parade which had been built by David Weatherhead, a former Chartist agitator. A wealthy grocer,  Provision Merchant and printer who had recently lost a son, Weatherhead bankrolled a new publication The Yorkshire Spiritual Telegraph.

Hermit Hole Wesleyan
Methodist Chapel

Photo's and information provided by Allan Smith
The corner stone was laid on Shrove Tuesday, 25th Feb1873 by William CLOUGH, and the last service was held by the Rev. F. Haigh JOWETT on 29th Jan1956

The Memorial Windows at Hermit Hole Methodist Church were a bequest in the Will of Hebden Wright, retired manufacturer, who died at 'The Whins, Hermit Hole on 23 July 1914. He left "a sum not exceeding £2000" to provide four stained glass windows "to be placed in the said church", one each in memory of his sister, Mary, his two brothers James and John, and himself. 

Left: Taken from the Minute Book of Hermit Hole Methodist Chapel, of which Sir John Clough was a Trustee, the item dated 28th Feb. 1914 and mentions a Sunday School and Chapel, sadly we do not know which one. Names mentioned are: Ellis Ratcliffe, John Ernshaw and William Joy. The last part makes reference to Sir John Clough receiving his Knighthood from King George.

 

 

Holy Trinity Lawkholme (1881 - 1974)
1846
   Prior to being built Divine service was held in a small mission room.
Building land donated by the Duke of Devonshire in 1878 and the church opened in 1882, demolished in 1972 
13th Nov 1888 The welcoming of the new vicar at Holy Trinity Church, Lawkholme, The Rev A.WILLIAMS 
Down Memory Lane From the Telegraph & Argus, 2003.
Harrison's fitted an organ in 1888 at the cost of £525. 1891 3 rd manual and 10 stops added, £224. Restored 1902.
Members of Holy Trinity Church, Lawkholme, pose informally at one of their between-the-wars Sunday School festivals. Appropriately, these were held on the weekend of Trinity Sunday, usually in June. On the Saturday afternoon they would walk in procession round the district, stopping to sing hymns at various points en route - in 1930, for example, at Bradford Street, Marlborough Street, Victoria Park gates, Parson Street, Eric Street and East Avenue. Usually they were accompanied and led by a band, though in 1931 their newly-formed troop of Wolf Cubs headed their procession, the Mothers' Union bringing up the rear. After tea in the Sunday School, sports and games were held at Threaproyd or at the cricket or rugby field. One novelty in 1930 was a race for mothers, the winner of which got a cake.

 

Ingrow Congregational Mission

A Separate Building, duly certified for religious worship, named CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH, situated at Ingrow, in the civil parish of Keighley, in the county of York, West Riding, in Keighley registration district, was on the 15th day of March, 1915, registered for solemnizing marriages therein, pursuant to 6th and 7th Wm. IV, c. 85.— Dated the 17th, March, 1915. 027 J. N. CLARKSON, Superintendent Registrar.
Ingrow United Reformed

 

Keighley Parish Church

Before 1846

                    

    

Bells 1914 


The newspaper cutting (right) from 1893 is interesting in that there was clearly some kind of nonsense over the church clock, something had caused the Church wardens to stop the church clock from telling the time to the town.

For information on the two rectories please see the Houses page


 

Knowle Park Congregational Mission built 1897 and would later become in 1972 Knowle Park United Reformed Church and now called Trinity Church
In 1896 John Brigg contributed an interest-free loan of £500 which six years later he converted into a gift towards the building of a Knowle Park Congregational Mission in Fell Lane.

16th February 1989 a notice appeared in the London Gazette announcing that it would no longer be registered for weddings. 



Lay cock Wesleyan Methodist Chapel 
Taken from William KEIGHLEY's 'Keighley Past & Present'. Laycock Wesleyan Chapel built in 1857. Accommodates over 400 worshipers. Cost about £700. 

Laycock Wesleyan day and Sunday School opened 12May1874 by the Rev. J. CLULOW of London. 286 Scholars. Cost about £1.500.

Lees and Bocking (Wesleyan) Methodist Chapel
1876-1978

Lees Methodist Church

Liberty Pentecostal Ministry Sunderland Street



Long Lee Wesleyan Methodist Chapel



Lund Park Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Built 1895

Left the school, church on the right

Where the school & Chapel used to stand

Marlborough Street Congregational Mission Church
A daughter church of Devonshire Street, built at the junction of Marlborough Street and Brown Street. 
The first service was held on 16th August 1883 and the last service held on 30th April 1961. Prayer meetings were started in the mid 1870's at 50 Marlborough Street.  An initiative of Mr. Ramsden, a draper in Low Street and an attendee of Upper Green. It was around 1882 that the congregation came to the attention of Sir John Brigg, with his support and backing a church was built. On the 31st October 1907, registered for solemnizing marriages therein. 
1942 during the war, meals were prepared at Utley Congregational and were transported to Marlborough Street, being the first wartime restaurant. 




Found in storage. If you have any information on any of the names on the memorial please contact menofworth 

 

New Jerusalem Church,  King-street 

Emanuel Swedberg,  scientist and philosopher  Formed the first New Jerusalem Society in Yorkshire. The temple was built in 1805 in King Street adjoining Acers Mill, owned by Barry Smith, who was a member.  
See entry for The Lords Church

NOTICE is hereby given, that a separate building, named New Jerusalem Church, situated at King Street, Keighley, in the parish of Keighley, in the county of York, in the district of Keighley, being a building certified according to law as a place of religious worship, was, on the 13th day of January, 1870, duly registered for solemnizing marriages therein, pursuant to the Act of 6th and 7th Wm. IV., cap. 85. Witness my hand this 21st of January, 1870. Geo. Spencer, Superintendent Registrar.

 


Oakworth Road Primitive Methodist Chapel, Now Church of Nazarene 
James Ickringill gave the Mission Hall  to the Primitive Methodists in 1911. The building became the Church of the Nazarene in 1962. Church of the Nazarene purchased ‘The Mission’ from the Methodists for the sum of £2,000

Oakworth Methodist Church
website

Park Lane Primitive Methodist Chapel 1885-1944
Small wooden mission chapel subordinate to St. Mary’s. Services 3 & 6.30 p.m. Sun, 7.30 p.m, thurs

Parkwood Methodist Chapel

Primitive Methodist Chapel
, Queen-street
Built in 1837 at a cost of £1,750, has been benefited by a subsequent outlay of £450, seating for 762.
Keighley Union. NOTICE is hereby given, that a separate building, named Primitive Methodist Chapel, situated at Queen-street, in Keighley, in the parish of Keighley, in the county of York, being a building certified according, to law as a place of religious worship, was on the 15th day of February, 1861, duly registered for solemnizing marriages therein, pursuant to the Act of the 6th and 7th Wm. IV., cap. 35. Witness my hand this 16th day of February, 1861. George Spencer, Superintendent Registrar.
From  Keighley, past and present: As a proof of the progress of this body of Christians we may add that they afterwards built a chapel in Sun Street, which proving too small, 
they erected the present handsome and commodious chapel in Queen Street, where divine service is now performed. The Wesleyan Association Methodists, who seceded from the 'Old Body' in 1828, in consequence of an organ dispute at Leeds, built a chapel in Sun Street, in which they now worship. They have very recently united with the Wesleyan Reformers, under the name of the "United Methodist Free Churches."

 

Primitive Methodist Chapel, South Street.


Providence Methodist Chapel
, South Street
1829
1835

From  Keighley, past and present: That section of the Methodist body called the 'New Connexion,' or 'Kilhamites,' built a chapel, and seemed to prosper in Keighley for a number of years. But owing to the imprudence of some of its trustees and leading members, the society gradually fell away until they were unable to support a minister and maintain the cause; they then sold the chapel, and sought among other congregations of the town for such spiritual fellowship and worship as they had hitherto enjoyed together. This building, which stands in South-street, was lately used as a coachmaker's shop, and it is now converted into shops and cottages.

 

Quaker Meeting House
Mill Street Skipton Road


Mill Street building bore the date 1709 yet in the Keighley year book for 1950 we find an entry which says it was established in 1690, demolished in 1938. Mill Street was most likely pulled down and rebuilt. 
The Upper green Congregational Chapel shared the same yard was not demolished in the clearance. The Society of Friends moved into their Skipton Road meeting house in 1936. Briggs opened a grave yard for friends on land just off North Dean Road which still exists. 
There used to be a friends burial ground near the Independent Chapel, the 1852 map shows their grave yard to be a separate entity. The first Chapel was established in 1690 on Mill Lane and demolished in 1937, the replacement built on Skipton Road in 1936. The Mill Street building had a burial-ground attached.
Briggs Sepulcher
 

 

Salvation Army, Cook Lane
General Booth 1882 1883

Salvation Army attacked in 1884

Spencer Street Congregational - Christ Church 
The Congregational chapel, Spencer street, was built at a cost of £4,000, opened in June, 1856, and has 1,000 sittings; connected with this chapel are various societies, a library of over 1,500 volumes and a Sunday school erected in Spencer street, at a cost of £4,000;
Spencer Street Sunday school and later becoming Christ Church (Congregational)
1942 was used as a wartime Restaurant, the meals being prepared first at Utley Congregational Chapel
Was used as an Auxiliary Military Hospital during the war. 
  

Spiritualist Church, Heber Street
1853 David Richmond (1816 – 1891) became a Spiritualist whilst living in America and upon his return to his native town of Darlington, England in 1853, tried unsuccessfully to open a Spiritualist church. He moved to Keighley and there established the first Spiritualist church in England. They took over Heber Street Wesleyan School in 1895 which had been built in 1872. Previous to moving into Heber Street they had held their meetings in Schools, working men's halls and the Lyceum Buildings, East Parade which had been built by David Weatherhead, a former Chartist agitator. A wealthy grocer,  Provision Merchant and printer who had recently lost a son, Weatherhead bankrolled a new publication The Yorkshire Spiritual Telegraph..


St Anne's Roman Catholic




From  Keighley, past and present: The Roman Catholics hired a room for service in South-street, in 1832; and about the year 1836 built their present chapel. We are not aware that they have made any converts among the English, but as there are some hundreds of resident Irish they muster a goodly congregation on the Sabbath day.
The architect of St. Annes Church was none other than Augustus Welby Northmore PUGIN, who would later find fame as architect of the interior of the Palace of Westminster, and the Clock Tower thereof.

St Barnabas, Long Lee
Built 1900
December 1900, fire broke out at the school church, due to the bad access even though the fire brigade were called there was little they could do. Erected in 1885 as a second mission church to St Mary's Eastwood, and constructed of wood and iron. Two week prior, part of the permanent stone church built close by and open for school propose. The brigade received the alarm about 10.15pm. The wind had fanned the flames and there was little remaining by the time they arrived. The accommodation was for around 120 worshipers. 

 

St. Johns Ingrow


Built 1843. Taken from the book written in 1943 by Percy HARDACRE, Alan DOBNEY & Alfred W. MITCHELL
Foundation stone laid 02Aug1841 on land given by the Earl of Burlington. Architect was Walker RAWSTHORNE of Bradford Built by William WADDINGTON of Ingrow. Cost about £2,000. Consecrated 14Mar1843 by Charles Thomas LONGLEY, then Lord Bishop of Ripon, and successively Lord Bishop of Durham, Archbishop of York and Archbishop of Canterbury. The clock was made by a Mr. CRYER of Bingley in 1866, and set in motion by William Gibbons MAYNE jnr., son of the first vicar who bore the same name.
 

 

St. Johns Newsholme
Robert Hall  built a large house in Newsholme around 1670. The Church came about when a descendent also called Robert Hall attended the parish church at Keighley, the Reverend at the time being Gale, Gale hated Robert Hall  and his son William Hall with a passion and refused him Communion, Hall stormed out of the church and converted part of his house to be used for worship around 1837, Fredrick Greenwood handed over two rooms to be used for worship around 1844. 

 

St. Joseph's Roman Catholic Church 
St.Joseph's in Queens Road was built in the Norman style in 1934 to the designs of Godfrey CLARKE.


St Marks Utley Website  
Many thanks to Mr. M Shearing for sharing the photographs and information
St Marks came from the Church Extension Scheme brought about by Reverend Busfeild, to meet the growing demand that the growing town with the growth of industry. The land was given by Cunliffe Pickersgill and his brother. 
In 1884 Mr. Longsdon had said about the land in the parish magazine "I have felt that our national Church cannot fulfil its duties if it leave a village, above a mile from the Parish Church entirely to the spiritual care, however zealous it may be, of other religious bodies, and that unless we take some steps to show our value of the offered site, we may lose it". 
In 1884 at Easter a small mission was started in the upper room of a cottage (demolished prior to 1949) situation opposite the then present church. They commenced in this small way with services on a Sunday and Thursday evenings. Mr. Davies a master from the Grammar School supervised the teachings. Later the the Mission Church was removed to another cottage in Green head Road and the Sunday School was founded. Miss J Smith of Croft Cottage, Low Utley was in charge. The full cost of furnishing the cottage was £21 2s 7d. 


The Mission
Sunday School
Inside St Mark's before 1938
1887 a meeting was held for the building of the School Church. The plans were drawn by Messrs W & J.B. Bailey for the church which would cost around £800. Pickersgill gave the land as promised but negotiations had to be done with Mr. H.I. Butterfield who had bought the remainder of Pickersgill land to exchange the land for the present site. The Duke of Devonshire and Mr. Butterfield gave £100 each towards the building, Thomas Clapham gave the heating apparatus, and J.B. Bailey his share of the architect's commission.
December 15th 1888 Mrs. F.D. Longsden laid the foundation stone. The week prior Keighley Mayor W Weatherhead lent his sale rooms in Low Street for a three day sale of works. A thirty page booklet was published guaranteeing a circulation of 4000. Not only did the booklet show the items for sale, but a sketch of the proposed School Church. Concerts were also arranged for the three evenings and one of the performances was by "The Highfield Juvenile Carbonised Minstrels". 
Once built the dedication service was held on Wednesday 26th June 1889 at 3pm, the preacher was Cannon Whitby. The new organ was American.
1910 it was decided to enlarge the church by adding three arches at the west end, plus vestries and a porch. Mr. Weatherhead once again opened his sale rooms to raise funds for the new work which realised £458 of the £546 needed. 
Around 1920 the purchased 12 Holker Street to be used as a residence of the Curate in charge. This proved to be an unsuitable residence and so around 1923 the land where the present St. Marks house now stands was bought. 
1926 and the church had electric lighting installed. 
30th January 1932 and the foundation stone for the Sunday School was laid by Sir Prince Prince-Smith, Miss M Clapham, Mr. Sam Shackleton and Ernest Heaps, and blessed by the Bishop of Bradford.  The Bishop opened the Sunday School on 18th September 1932.


St Mary's The Virgin, Worth Village (Eastwood) Built 1855. 
Ford garage pretty well takes up the area that the Church, School and vicarage once stood.
When built the church and school stood in large grounds surrounded by trees and greenery.


 

June 25 1893 The Rev. Joseph PRINCE curate of St Mary's, Eastwood, Keighley, he hanged himself. 
Rev Heinz Arnold  of Jewish origin who escaped to England during the second World War. He was Curate 1945 to 1948.
Taken from the Keighley News: Diocese spokesman John Hansen said Mr. Arnold was savagely beaten by the SS — Hitler’s most ruthless troops — and left for dead. The Rev Heinz Arnold was among pastors of Jewish origin who escaped to England during the Second World War. Mr. Hansen said: “He crawled home on his hands and knees and was then taken to a concentration camp. “Somehow he was freed and got to England and with the help of Bishop Bell, of Chichester, he trained for the Church of England priesthood.” Mr. Arnold became curate of St Mary the Virgin Church, Eastwood, from 1945 to 1948.

Newspaper cutting from 1855

Taken from Keighley Past and Present: friends of the Anglican Church may well rejoice at the completion of the third of the four additional new churches required to meet the spiritual wants of the parish, in accordance with its re-division, evincing, as it does, her great inherent strength and energies to be paramount to all difficulties.
The entire outlay on ecclesiastical and school buildings in this parish, during the last 16 years, amounts to no less a sum than £16,000. Verily, "She hath done what she could." The licensed room in the Eastwood district has been superseded by the erection of a neat little church, in the early English style of architecture, and dedicated to St. Mary the Virgin. It has 508 sittings, and a good organ; cost £2057., exclusive of the ground, which was given by the munificent Earl of Burlington, and it was consecrated by the Lord Bishop of Ripon in June, 1855. The living is a perpetual curacy, valued at £150. per annum, and in the alternate gift of the crown and the Bishop of Ripon. This district, containing a population of 3500 persons, was constituted under Sir Robert Peels Act, in 1844, out of a portion of the south east of the town and parish, and an adjoining slip of Bingley parish. The Rev. J. Room, B.A., the present Incumbent, succeeded the late Rev. Timothy Brayshaw, M. A., author of “Metrical Mnemonics," who died in 1854. (Broom was still there in 1861). A school and master's house are in course of building, on the same plot of ground, at the estimated cost of £960.

St Matthew’s Church Braithwaite built in 1854 now known as Keighley New Church.

It is said to have been established in 1789 but no evidence to support this has ever been found. It is possible that service were held at the hall or even outdoors. The adjacent Sunday School was opened in 1893.
 

St. Michael Bracken Bank 1964 - 1981

 

St. Paul's Mission Church Parkwood
Built 1884 used by Parkwood Youth Club 1961 -1964

Plans and designs by Mr. J.B Bailey, North- street, Keighley

 

St. Peters, Halifax Road
St. Peter’s iron mission church, built on the Halifax road in 1872 at a cost of £650, raised by subscription, and a bit given by the Waddington Hospital trust, was replaced by a stone structure, to be completed in 1881, when a separate district was formed.
24th March 1889 The Bishop of Penrith preaches at St. Peter's Church, Keighley. The vicarage was on Victoria Road. 


Taken from Keighley News By Ian Dewhirst 
St Peter’s Church, in Halifax Road, was understandably described, on its consecration in 1882, as “a fine, substantial and well-built edifice, of lofty proportions”, as can be seen in these interior and exterior views. Providing at that time “for the spiritual wants of the large and increasing population of the Parish of Keighley”, it could seat 850. Founded appropriately on St Peter’s Day in 1872, its congregation had originally worshipped in an iron mission while a building fund appealed for “weekly subscriptions of a penny and upwards”. The Duke of Devonshire contributed £1,000 and churchwarden W L Marriner £500. Its stone came from Woodhouse Quarry and its pews were of pitch pine. A centre for its community, St Peter’s activities included Men’s and Women’s Help Societies, a Band of Hope, a Church Temperance Society and a Mothers’ Union, Bible and singing classes, and even a sewing group, a sick club, a savings bank and a Sunday School scholars’ library. Social habits change, however, and the church was demolished in 1956, although its congregation continued to worship till 1975 in its former Sunday School in nearby Kensington Street.
The clock from St. Peter's church was re-installed at Holycroft School.


*Sun Street Wesleyan  Methodist Chapel 

The Sun. street Wesleyan chapel was purchased in 1873 for £600 and will seat 250
From  Keighley, past and present: As a proof of the progress of this body of Christians we may add that they afterwards built a chapel in Sun-street, which proving too small, they erected the present handsome and commodious chapel in Queen Street, where divine service is now performed. The Wesleyan Association Methodists, who seceded from the 'Old Body' in 1828, in consequence of an organ dispute at Leeds, built a chapel in Sun-street, in which they now worship. They have very recently united with the Wesleyan Reformers, under the name of the "United Methodist Free Churches."

THE LONDON GAZETTE, FEBRUARY 12, 1869
NOTICE is hereby given, that a separate building, named the United Methodist Free Church, situate at Cavendish Street, in Keighley, in the parish of Keighley, in the county of York, in the district of Keighley, being a building certified according to law as a place of religious worship, was, on the 17th day of November, 1868, duly registered for solemnizing marriages therein, pursuant to the Act of 6th and 7th  Wm. IV., cap. 85, being substituted for the building known as the United Methodist Free Church Chapel, at Sun-street, Keighley aforesaid, now, disused. Witness my hand this 8th of February, 1869. Geo. Spencer, Superintendent Registrar.

 

 

Swedenborgian kings Street
Built 1805 and would later be used as a mill warehouse. James Hindmarsh's (son of James Hindmarsh, a Methodist minister) daughter married William Illingworth founder of Grove Mills at Ingrow

 

Temple Street Wesleyan Methodist Chapel

First church built 1754 and replaced 1846. Final service was conducted there Sunday 1st September 1974.
The 1846 build  cost including day and Sunday school premises and two ministers’ houses of £14,000; it will seat 1,655 persons.
John Greenwood of Cabbage House was a keen Methodist, he paid from his own pocket the fee's of a minister for two years. A man who resided in Temple Street objected to the Methodist and in an attempt to stop  people using Temple Street to get to the church, he put up a pair of strong gates and padlocked them. Greenwood on hearing this sent a message to the man saying if they were not removed immediately he would send two of his strongest horses and he would have the gates pulled down, the gates were removed. This incident must have occurred before 1807 as this is the year John Greenwood died. 
Clayton of Low Mill was one of the founders of Temple Row Sunday School. From Keighley Past and present: "The foundation-stone of the Wesleyan Methodist Chapel, Keighley, was laid on Monday, the 28th day of July, in the ninth year of the reign of Her Majesty Queen Victoria, and in the year of our Lord, 1845, by Lodge Calvert of Bradford, Gent. "This new chapel stands upon the site of the first Methodist Chapel erected in Keighley, which was built in 1754 rebuilt, 1777; and upon the erection of Eden Chapel in 1810, was converted into a Sunday School. 
Its Trustees are—: Mr. Lodge Calvert, Mr. Thomas Waterhouse, Mr. Samuel Smith, Thomas Pearson, Thomas Midgley, John Holmes, Nathan Holmes, John Craven, Jonas Sugden, John Laycock, William Thomas, Nathaniel Walbank. 
"The members of the building committee are Mr. Samuel B. Clapham, Mr. Edmund Laycock, Mr. William Lund and the Town Trustees. "This stone was laid in the 106th year of the existence of Wesleyan Methodism, and the 103rd year of its introduction into Keighley. The Rev. Jabez Bunting, D. D., being the President, and the Rev.
Robert
Newton, D.D., the Secretary of the Conference. 
"The Sabbath School, which was re-established in 1807, and is well arranged, contains 711 children, and is conducted gratuitously by two presidents, eight superintendents and 106 teachers. The Day School, conducted on the Glasgow system by one master and two mistresses, instructs upwards of 250 children. "Lodge Calvert of Bradford, Gent, (being the only trustee living on the enlargement of the first erection), officiated in laying the stone, which was preceded by an affecting prayer from the Rev. J. Hanson of Haworth, and followed by an address from the Rev. J. Skidmore, who after having read the inscriptions on the plates, proceeded to comment on the early days of Methodism in Keighley, and traced its infant commencement from three members, who constituted the society here in 1742, and which by regular steps have increased to 1778 in 103 years. 
The Rev. J. Everett of York and the Rev. J. Rayner also addressed the assembly at some length, on the gratifying fact that Methodism instead of retrograding, as some parties had gratuitously asserted, was increasing in numbers, which was a novel sign of going backwards." This circuit has been comparatively free from the great defections which have recently signalised the history of Methodism; it now numbers about 2000 members, 40 local preachers and 100 class meetings; in fact it is one of the most prosperous circuits in the kingdom".

 

*The Lords Church, King Street. Built 1805. Church and grave yard.



The society's first place of worship in a house in Beckside which was then situated in green fields. The most well known minister of Keighley New Church was the Rev. Joseph Wright who was ordained as the third minister of the New Church in 1790 - the other two being Hindmarsh and Samuel Smith. who had also served in the Great Haworth. Round. The New Church opened its first Sunday school in 1791. In 1805 the society built its first chapel in King Street (See entry for New Jerusalem Church).  The premises in Devonshire Street were opened in 1891.

NOTICE is hereby given, that a separate building, named New Jerusalem Church, situated at King Street, Keighley, in the parish of Keighley, in the county of York, in the district of Keighley, being a building certified according to law as a place of religious worship, was, on the 13th day of January, 1870, duly registered for solemnizing marriages therein, pursuant to the Act of 6th and 7th Wm. IV., cap. 85. Witness my hand this 21st of January, 1870. Geo. Spencer, Superintendent Registrar.





 

Thwaites Democratic Sunday School. The first mention we have seen of this Sunday school was in this news paper report from 1841, we were aware of a Democratic Sunday School in Keighley on Sun Street. 


Upper Green Congregational Chapel, & grave yard,
Upper Green, Old Bridge Street. Also known as the Independent Chapel,  situated around where the Salvation Army is now. 

 


 

 

 

 

The above photo provided by Kevin Seaton

1760 the first chapel was erected. 1821 a replacement was built with gallery and pulpit and adjoining Sunday School and a Manse for the Minister. Upper Green closed and sold to pay for Devonshire Street and was taken over by the Glory Band. In 1874 it was sold again to Devonshire Street for use as a Mission Church, but  became a separate church in 1886. 26th Feb. 1889 The reopening of Upper Green Congregational Chapel, after undergoing considerable structural alterations.
See also  maggieblanck.com

 


Utley
Congregational Chapel
The first name on the roll of members of the Utley congregation was that of Miss Ann Clapham. Erected in 1871—2, at a cost of £2,300, a Sunday school being held in rooms beneath the chapel.

Utley United Reformed Church
Utley Mission Church. See St. Marks

Utley Wesleyan Chapel
  


Victoria Park Wesleyan Methodist Chapel 1863-1975 Rebuilt 1891
    Started out being called Eastwood New Wesleyan Chapel, having relocated in 1891 and around 1899 changed it's name to Victoria Park Methodist. Located at the junction of Marlborough Street and Bradford Road, backing onto Spruce Street, the Sunday School was next door, going down Marlborough Street and backing onto Austin Street, Eastwood School was next door to this. 


Wesley Place (Wesleyan) Chapel Demolished
Ingrow’s first Wesleyan Chapel  was built  at Hermit Hole in 1840 at the
bottom of Ingram Street, and opened in October 1840 at a cost of £440. 
It was built to accommodate the growing number of scholars at the White House, which stood in what would later become part of the grounds at 'The Whins'. The White House was demolished in 1926 when Whinswood Park was laid out. 
After the move to Paper Mill Bridge from Ingram Street, the building was sold for £325-10s on 04 April 1865 to John & James WRIGHT, who used it as a weaving shed until 1915.

Wesley Place Methodist Church
Photo's and additional information provided by Allan Smith

In order to accommodate the scholars as quickly as possible at Paper Mill Bridge, the school and schoolmaster's house were built first. This is where the present chapel now is. The foundation stone was laid on 18 April 1862 by Robert CLOUGH, and the building cost £1,416. The foundation stone of the large chapel  was laid by the not-yet-knighted Isaac HOLDEN on 10 March 1863, the day of the royal wedding when Edward, Prince of Wales (Edward VII) married Princess Alexandra of Denmark.
It was opened on Friday 15 April 1864 and cost £2,312. In May 1865, the foundations were undermined during the cutting of Ingrow Tunnel on the Worth Valley Railway. The front of the chapel moved away from the rest of the building, and for safety's sake, the place was closed in the following June. Bradford architect, Henry Francis LOCKWOOD, whose office would later design the new Mechanics Institute in Keighley, examined the premises and announced that no satisfactory repairs would put it in order. It must be taken down and moved back 50 feet. And so it was.  The foundation stone of the rebuilt chapel was laid by Miss Ann CLOUGH on 02 May 1867, and opened on Friday 29 November of the same year, having cost £2,999-17s. After a four year struggle, the Trustees were awarded £1,980 by the Midland Railway Company. The chapel succumbed to dry rot, and was demolished during the 1950s. It is interesting to note that Isaac HOLDEN didn't get asked to lay the foundation stone again. Trouble was, he was one of the Midland Railway lot who had caused all the trouble, and it was he who had cut the first sod for the railway on Shrove Tuesday 1864. We have heard that his purchase and renovation of 'Meadowfield', and the giving of it to be used as a manse, was seen by some to be an act of atonement.

The chapel is now housed within what was originally the Sunday school building. 
The last service was held Christmas 2012 and the event reported in the Keighley News January 2013

 

West Lane Primitive Methodist Church

A stone structure in the Italian style, erected in 1879—80, at a total cost of £3,600 and will seat 800 persons.
In it's day it was possible to enter from either West lane or Devonshire Street West, which used to be called Laycock Road. The Sunday School was next door replacing the building that was used sitting behind the church.

 

Worth Village Primitive Methodist Chapel





The corner stone was laid in 1874 by Mrs. B Emmott Opened in 1874 and cost £810 Situated on Thwaites Lane between Oastler street and Greenwood Street. 

Photo top left by Allan Smith


Worth Village Thwaites Baptist Chapel 


Corner of Fruit Street and Marlow street (now Dalton Lane)  erected in 1873—4 at a cost of £1,200



Photo  taken 15th April 1981 by Allan Smith



 

Worth Wesleyan Methodist Chapel Timber St
1874


The Worth village Wesleyan chapel was erected in 1875 at a cost of £2,650 and will seat 500.




1873